Advising Dean broke my heart

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  • #19208
    Amy26Amy26
    Participant

    Get a load of this…. I met with the dean of pre-med advising at Temple University, who also happens to be head of faculty and Temple. Some big cheese he was! In a matter of a half hour he dashed every hope I had of getting into med school to absolute smithereens!!! :banghead: I was at rutgers university about 8 years ago, and didn’t have a good gpa then. Only got in about a year of credits, then withdrew classes the next year. Finally, he said that I should major in biology, because that is what will give me the best handle on the MCAT’s, and that I shouldn’t really worry about clinical or volunteer experience…that med schools really don’t care that much about it… they’re more worried about my gpa and mcat scores. He said if after majoring in bio, I don’t get in, then I can go back to school for 2 more years for nursing. Oh, let’s not forget the creme de la creme of the conversation…. I’m too old!!!!! I’ll be 30 by the time I start applying. He said for every year that passes by, It gets more and more difficult to get in. And that schools really don’t want you by the time you’re 30. I’ve heard of tough love… but my gosh… I was ready to jump out of a window or become the person that cleans your windshields at red lights for loose change after that conversation!!! Just thought I’d throw this out there to see if anything he said was wrong. I heard that med schools want to see anything except a bio major (too redundant) and he said the opposite. I also thought that it’s not that big of a deal being an older student… he said the opposite.

    Grrr… why am I so frustrated now!?!?! I appreciate any feedback on this.

    #19209
    EM momEM mom
    Participant

    :goodvibes: ! And not to do extracurriculars is absolute career suicide! It was the ONLY thing I was asked about at my interviews. Hang in there and DO NOT let this discourage you :grouphug:

    #19210
    Doc201XDoc201X
    Participant

    First, go tell this idiot to go straight to he!!. Second, you’re going to have to get use to people discouraging you its unfortunate but trust me it happens all the time.. Third, I have a similar situation as yours but still managed to get accepted MD/PhD YEARS later( I didn’t matriculate for personal reasons). And only AFTER I had taken a large pill called self-estteem!!!

    However, I have to agree with him that you should NOT go into nursing unless you really wan to be a nurse. But I also don’t feel you have to major in a particular subject although I think a biology degree with upper division courses in classes like endocrinology would be very helpful as far as med school prep is concerend. On the other hand, my problem the biology degree is that if you don’t get in, generally speaking you’ll have a degree that doesn’t pay much in the employment world. Also there are a zillion biology majors trying to get into medical school so I think it’s alsways better to stand out in some way.

    As for the number of hours you want to take I remember being told by one of the admissions recruitesr at Chapel Hill in 1992 that “you either want to work or you want to go to medical school”. At the time I thought that was very unrealistic for me but in the end I think he was right. Taking a full-load of courses (in 1997-1999 as a graduate student with a stipend so I could eat) did absolute wonders for my self-esteem and self-confidence and made me believe that I could handle the rigors of medical school. Remember, medical school is full-time.
    Taking out loans to support yourself seems a small price to pay for the career of a lifetime!

    Fianlly, I think it’s important to keep in mind that it is better to take your time and do this right than to rush into the process because you’re getting older. Good Luck!

    #19211
    Amy26Amy26
    Participant

    Thank you sooooooooooooo much for your responses. I was really feeling down in the dumps. Well, I’m taking the advice about the nursing thing. As a matter of fact, I had to switch my courses around for the spring semester and drop the prerequisites for nursing that I had registered for. But I am going to stick this out. I’m going to get in sooner or later. I don’t care if I have to reapply, or maybe even go for graduate studies and then reapply but this will happen for me.

    You guys are awesome… I feel a little better about it. Thanks a bunch :grouphug: .

    #19212
    DONOTDELETE ****DONOTDELETE**
    Participant

    Totally agree with the above posters. Go tell your pre-med advisor that I am 37 and received acceptances to NINE schools including TEMPLE so there. The only thing that I do agree with him is on two points: the do not go the nursing route and try to go full time (15-18 hours) if you can *afford it*. Of course if you are helping support your family then no, but if it is just you get loans, go full time to prove to adcoms that you are very very serious about medical school. Good luck.

    #19213
    TexasRoseTexasRose
    Participant

    You are on the right track, hang in there! :goodvibes: Theresa

    #19214
    PremedRNPremedRN
    Participant

    I am curious to know why is it looked at differently when one is considering to do undergrad nursing for a bachelor’s along with premed prereqs? Would it also be advised not to go for engineering undergrad if you wanted to be a doctor? We get diversity from these different majors.
    I didnt go into nursing as a back up plan, I went into nursing because I had no confidence for several reasons and lost my dream of becoming a doc. I was considering going for my BSN (I have an ADN) because I am already half-way there from my associate’s degree, it would work out better financially, just my school wont have the BSN for awhile, but it’s in the works. My undergrad now is Liberal Arts.
    If one doesn’t get into med school, that person is going to be responsible for paying back those undergrad loans, and if it is in a degree that wont land him or her a decent job, basically, they’re screwed.
    To me, other than maybe being more prepared for the MCAT (maybe not), a bio or chem degree almost has nothing to do with what you are going to do when becoming a doc (OB/GYN,IM,ER,FP). Certainly bio lays down a basic foundation for sciences, but I could ask A LOT of docs a general biology question and they wont know the answer, tells me, it must not be used much and has been forgotten. At least with nursing you know meds, med treatments, pathophysiology, what it is to be a doc……..So why not nursing?

    —-Dana

    #19215
    DONOTDELETE ****DONOTDELETE**
    Participant

    Because nursing and medicine although both deal with treating patients have nothing in common. I know that engineering, bio, chem, may also have nothing in common but usually they are not considered professional type terminal degrees either. Folks that pursue nursing for the most part want to be that, nurses. Folks who pursue biology or chemistry are usually but not all headed for medicien, pharmacy, veterinary, etc..I hope this makes some sense. Also, due to the nursing shortage why take nursing and learn the nursing “way” to then not practice nursing? it seems a waste IMHO *unless* you want to be a nurse. The nursing methodology, patient care approach, heck the whole curriculum is nothing like medical school. Yes, some areas may overlap but that is about it. Nursing should not be a “backup”, I truly believe that it is a profession and folks should do it because they have a passion for it and they would love to be nurses. I really wonder sometimes when folks “just” get nursing as a means to medical school it makes no sense at all. Now, if you like nursing and then for some reason change your mind later on that is okay we all do that. But starting a nursing program KNOWING that you want to be a doctor is just kind of nonsense and pre-med advisors and possibly adcoms will go like “huh?”

    #19216
    PremedRNPremedRN
    Participant

    Yeah, I can see your point, that does give it better light.
    I just think for some reason it is looked at differently by many if one pursues nursing as undergrad as opposed to engineers, etc then goes straight to med schools.
    There are big differences between docs and nurses but more important, and both in common, is the fact that it involve patient treatment, and care. I would think with having a nursing degree then going to med school, may not look wholehearted at being a nurse, but would appear to be a continued interest in caring for people as a whole.

    #19217
    DrWuStar *DrWuStar*
    Participant

    Amy 26, don’t let that guy discourage you. plenty of people have had success in this process despite doing everything he told you not to. there are different roads to becoming a doctor, and you have to choose the one that suits you best. i think the fact that many people entering med school these days are older and have had a variety of life experiences before entering med school really adds richness to the medical profession.

    you reminded me of this einstein quote:

    “Great spirits have always encountered violent opposition from mediocre minds.”

    not that the dean is a mediocre mind, but many of the people who discourage you along the way will be. keep your eye on the ball and you will excel regardless of whether they want you to.

    keep your head up. 😉

    #19218
    Amy26Amy26
    Participant

    Wow…I do feel better. Oddly enough, after the initial hurt and frustration, this has only strenghtened my resolve. Along with the support of everyone here. :yes: So marching on we go………

    #19219
    Doc201XDoc201X
    Participant

    Originally posted by PremedRN:
    To me, other than maybe being more prepared for the MCAT (maybe not), a bio or chem degree almost has nothing to do with what you are going to do when becoming a doc (OB/GYN,IM,ER,FP).

    Perhaps not for the specialities listed, but chem and bio are extremely important for pathology.

    I should also add that a few years ago I read that nurses have the LOWEST acceptance to medical school of all professions. Although the difference may only be a few percentage points here or there why take a chance on a major that’s only your second choice.

    #19220
    PremedRNPremedRN
    Participant

    Yeah, that’s why I listed those specialties.
    Out of those nurses who applied was there MCAT GPA comparable to the other applicants?
    I know a girl who double majored in biology and nursing who got in, and in fact, know of 3 others BSN’s locally that have gotten in.
    I was told from a doc who had been on an admissions committee that they loved nurses.
    I know this topic is of debate. I just dont think it is fair to discriminate against an applicant who enjoys helping people so decided undergrad to do nursing, which also happens to guarantee a good paying job anywhere in the US
    in the event of not getting into medical school. But sometimes life isnt fair. I mean, I dont want to be a path, or a researcher, that is not my interest, so biology would not suit me.

    #19221
    LindseyLindsey
    Participant

    I was a social worker in my previous life, and while working full time I went back to pick up science credits a few at a time. I had an okay undergrad gpa YEARS ago, but I made really good grades in my Master’s work. My sciences that I picked up later (at most 2 classes at a time) were good. I made a 30 on my MCAT, and I started medical school at age 35….and was accepted in the FIRST round of acceptances….not because of my excellent MCAT or grades obviously….but because (I think) of my life experiences! So…change advisors. You don’t need that negativity in your life, girl! Hang in there, and keep pluggin’ away.

    #19222
    Doc201XDoc201X
    Participant

    Originally posted by PremedRN:
    [b] I just dont think it is fair to discriminate against an applicant who enjoys helping people so decided undergrad to do nursing, which also happens to guarantee a good paying job anywhere in the US
    in the event of not getting into medical school. But sometimes life isnt fair. [/b]

    I think you’re right and it seems logical to me that nurses would make great doctors(both my mother an ARNP, and my best friend a BSN, are nurses and two of the smartest people I know). However, I know far more science majors that were accepted to med school.

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