Breastfeeding & Pumping

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  • #39235
    mama me memama me me
    Participant

    Kudos to all you out there who have endured being a slave to the pump for the benenfit of you children! I have done it twice, once in residency and once in practice. I know first hand it is not easy and commend you on your efforts. My biggest frustration was the front office staff always double booking me just before and after my scheduled pump breaks. I think if people have never breastfed and pumped, they just don’t “get it”. I have two comments. . Someone had asked about suggestions for dwindling milk supply. This always happened to me, too. What I could figure out was it was likely a combination of dehydration and stress. Are you drinking enough during your busy day? Sometimes that can be challenging when you’re running all day. The stress part is harder to control. My second comment is about the night waking. My first child slept through the night at 9 weeks. So I expected the same this time around. Guess what? She is 6 months and still up about 3 times a night. We did let her cry it out because she was getting up every 1 1/2 hours. Now we are down to a schedule we can atleast live with. I think every child is so different, that you need to find out what works best for your child and what you feel comfortable with. As tired as you are, try to remind yourself that this is only temporary and that the infant stage is so short. Soon you will be looking back and longing for this period in your life. Hang in there everyone!

    #39236
    elisemomof3elisemomof3
    Participant

    I was lookig through a lactation periodical and there was an advertisement for a really unique pump system. There are dual SILENT pumps that you can actually slip into your bra and WALK AROUND IN THEM with no one knowing you have them on!!! :tired: ! Thank you makers of lactation supplies for a SILENT pump :rolleyes: . Anyway, I don’t remember the name of the pumps but I believe that there a few brands out there. Good luck all you wonderful breastfeeding moms!

    Yours,
    Elise 😀

    #39237
    snssns
    Participant

    Wow! Self-contained pump that allows you to walk around. I think I would still feel too weird to walk around the clinic with it on but it would have been nice to be able to move around my office.

    I quit my job 4 months ago so no longer pump (still nursing though). I did pump for 18 months with a Medela Pump In Style. I got the Hands-free kit, which is a piece of plastic that allows you to attach the shield to your Medela bra. I couldn’t have continued to pump for so long without the Hands-free attachment.

    I was only allowed to pump during my lunch break, so I pumped the entire hour. I taped a sign on my office door that said “breastpumping”. That usually scared away anyone that wanted to bother me. I would bring my lunch and keep a really large glass of kool-aid on my desk. The hands-free kit allowed me to pump both breasts while I ate my lunch, made phone calls, answered emails, did online CME, etc. It also allowed me to have both hands free in case a stubborn plugged duct needed heat or massage applied to it. It was the best $15 I ever spent.

    #39238
    GracieThreeGracieThree
    Participant

    I had the Hands-Free kit too, and now I give it to every pregnant woman I know who plans to pump. I actually had time for leisure reading while I pumped! LOL – and haven’t had time since… oh well!

    I am wondering what will happen with my appointments when I have to pump at work in the future – guess we’ll see!

    #39239
    FPmommyFPmommy
    Participant

    Thank you so much to all who wrote back 🙂 I am so happy to be doing less pumping. I wish I had had the silent pump – sounds great but this is my final baby so I will leave it to others. Just FYI for others, I tried the hands-free thing last baby and it didn’t work for me. It didn’t fit me well enough, somehow. So all this baby I have jammed one cone against the desk periodically to be able to briefly have one hand for computer, phone, etc. Not the easiest.
    After thinking about it I decided to try pumping once a day (which I find more or less tolerable) and see if I can keep enough supply to make it through my 2-week Holiday vacation (in December) without needing bottles for her. I would be OK with that some, but my baby has already proven herself over and over to be difficult about bottles so I don’t think she would cooperate like other babies might. After that I think we will get rid of the pump and plan to either way cut back or wean. My husband has tried to cooperate, but he is telling me he is very sick of it all. (I have been pumping a lot at home the last few days, for example, because my baby is sick and barely nursing enough to avoid dehydration.)
    Thank you again to all the women who have written on this topic and encouraged all of us breasfeeding and pumping mothers 😀 😉 :p 🙂

    #39240
    GracieThreeGracieThree
    Participant

    So how are things going, FPMommy?

    #39241
    docnrolldocnroll
    Participant

    I went back to work at 6 weeks on both kids and was able to breastfeed 18 months with first and 22 with second working full time. Only pumped for first 12 weeks… never enough milk while they were in growth spurts but luckily my body adjusted and my kids loved am, pm nursing and during the night and would even nurse more on weekends… worked for me to supplement with formula but I know it doesn’t work for everyone…

    #39242
    docnrolldocnroll
    Participant

    I went back to work at 6 weeks on both kids and was able to breastfeed 18 months with first and 22 with second working full time. Only pumped for first 12 weeks… never enough milk while they were in growth spurts but luckily my body adjusted and my kids loved am, pm nursing and during the night and would even nurse more on weekends… worked for me to supplement with formula but I know it doesn’t work for everyone…

    #39243
    DrBethDrBeth
    Participant

    So refreshing to see I wasn’t the only one to have struggled with this.

    I’m an attending in an IM subspecialty, working 4-5 days a week employed by a hospital as faculty for their residency and fellowship with considerable clinical responsibility. I’m now in my early 40’s, nursing baby #3, who is 2 years and 2 months. Baby #1 came 5.5 years ago, after a year of infertility treatment. If you think pumping is time consuming and intrusive and throws off your work schedule, it was a breeze after that year of tx. Nursed and pumped til he was 6 months old (AAP recommendation was 6-12 months of nursing back then), then weaned to formula to try to have another baby. Baby #2 was born 10 months later, and I nursed him til he weaned himself at 14 months. Stopped pumping at 10 months, when I just wasn’t getting anything from the pump, though there was plenty of milk when he nursed. Baby number #3 came just over 2 years ago. He was a preemie who was very tough to get to nurse, but I figured this was my last chance to nurse, so I was determined. Stopped pumping at 11 months, again because of no yield. He’s still quite interested in nursing, and my supply is fine. He nurses mornings, when I get home from work, 1-3 times in the evening up til his bedtime, and frequently once during the night. On days I don’t work, he nurses as least one more time before his nap. No one but my hubby seems to have a good thing about him still nursing. Fortunately hubby is OK with it.

    #39244
    KatieKatie
    Participant

    Hi to all you great breastfeeding moms. I am not a MD, yet, not even in medical school. However, I am a full-time RN, taking night courses to get my pre-med sciences in with a two and a half year old. I was like you in that working in maternal child health and always pointing out the importances of breastfeeding was very determined to breastfeed until one year. I pumped until that marker and had always said I wasn’t going to be “one of those people” breastfeeding when the child could ask for it. Well, after a year, I stopped pumping but really wanted that great feeling of breastfeeding without the hassle of having to pump. I said I would continue until she was 18 months. She was a lot like your babies in that she still woke up at night to nurse three or so times. Then it was for mostly comfort at night and at nap times. She ate regular food and had whole milk in a sippy cup during the day. I never pushed her too hard to try to wean. When she turned two, she was still nursing, but I was ready for it to end. I increased non-nursing cuddle time and prepared her by saying, “In blank days we’ll need to stop “feed you” (her term for it)” Then the next day say the same thing, finally when the day came, I said “Ok you are a big girl so if you need some milk or water just ask” The first few nights she woke up asking for it and I would say remember you are a big girl, would you like milk or water. My husband for the first time would get up to get what she wanted (she still sleeps right next to us in her day bed). For a few days Dad could walk on water, so that hurt my feelings a little, but it was also nice to see. Now she sleeps through the night and is completely weaned, and is waiting for a little brother or sister due in August…we’ll see how that goes:)

    So I hope things go better for you without so much pressure to pump. Good luck:)
    Katie 😉

    #39245
    DONOTDELETE ****DONOTDELETE**
    Participant

    Hi! I am long past the stage of breastfeeding now, but I nursed each of my babies until age 17 months (they either self-weaned at that point or I encouraged it because I was pregnant again). Anyway, if this post is still active, maybe my experiences will be useful to somebody.
    I was fortunate to have my kids after I finished training. Mostly I was doing locums in family doctors’ offices. Let me tell you, we have it much easier than most women who try to pump at work! A big private office, staff who respect your privacy, a handy refrigerator, and even lots of sterile specimen bottles to do the collecting in! I was fortunate to have only a few night calls when nursing, during which occasionally they would let me use the electric pump in the maternity ward. Wow! Vacuums it all out in 3 minutes! Otherwise, I expressed manually–once I got the hang of it I didn’t need a pump.
    The real secret to pumping is to wait till you get a good let-down reflex, so waiting till you think of the baby and start to tingle, or even hear another baby cry, makes it easier.
    When I first started I supplemented with formula, but especially once my babies were on solids, they didn’t seem to want as many bottle feedings during the day. Like other moms have described, instead they took to waking more frequently at night to nurse instead. I’ve found since (from patients) that this is a pretty common occurrence when the nursing mom goes back to work. And, like the others, husbands get tired of or freaked out by baby in the bed. After the first one, I found it easier to have a fold out couch or something in the baby’s room where I could doze off too–that helps with the exhaustion. (And face it, as doctors most of us are never going to get to take an uninterrupted night’s sleep for granted anyway.)
    Once baby is not only doing well on solids but drinking from a cup (I think that was around 9 months, it’s really been a while!) I stopped having to pump at work unless I was gone a really long time. But the most productive pumping of the day would be right after the first feeding when I got home–there would still be lots of milk, and the baby triggers a far better let-down so you can just keep going till you’re empty. And since the pumping is mostly done at home,the storage and transportation aren’t a problem.

    #39246
    DONOTDELETE ****DONOTDELETE**
    Participant

    I have 5 children, all nursed for at least 18 months. I am still nursing my 2.8 yr old. I never had to use formula. As long as they needed milk in a bottle I pumped, but by the time they were about 10mnth old they got cows milk by cup and solids when i was at work, and I bf them when i was at home. I am a family physician, so luckily I don’t have to stay away at nights. My daughter still wakes 1-2 times a night to nurse, but this is no problem at all as she sleeps right beside us, and I don’t have to get out of my bed – she just crawls over, and then I put her back. My husband also loves her sleeping with us. I really recommend finding a sleeping arrangement which involves as little getting up at night as possible. It has been so much easier with this baby than with the others who either slept in their own beds, and i had to get up several times at night, or slept in our bed and kicked us all night! Now we have another bed pushed up to ours, and there is room for everyone, and also room for us!

    It is difficult pumping and working, but when they get older you can just go on bf whenever you are at home, and feeding other things when you are at work.

    #39247
    DONOTDELETE ****DONOTDELETE**
    Participant

    Well, shoot. I just composed a reply and I messed it up and the computer ate it. I will try again when I have time (which is very tough to find) soon. We are still nursing 🙂

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