EMT

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  • #61427
    undecidedundecided
    Participant

    Anyone had experience as an EMT? This is one of my considerations as a part-time job while doing my postbacc to earn enough to pay my bills. Positive and worthwhile experience? Thanks.

    #61429
    Maria_dup2Maria_dup2
    Participant

    I am studying EMT – B right now — considering going to paramedic school as part of my post bach.

    I should be done in January, I think if you find a good program to attend to you learn a lot – but is seems EMT-B do not really make much money…

    So if you are doing this to make a living maybe you will not be making enough…

    Just my two cents
    :twocents:

    #61430
    DreyDrey
    Participant

    I’m an EMT and I found it was a great way to get clinical experience as an undergrad, even if the pay isn’t spectacular. On the other hand, the pay is certainly well above minimum wage, and if you are in the suburbs, you can take work with you and get quite a bit done at the firehouse or station in between calls.

    EMS = Earn Money Sleeping. 😎

    In addition, I think that EMTs and Paramedics are generally a great down to earth group of people. You will meet people all along the chain of care, from the first people on the scene up to the ER docs you drop them off with, especially if you work in a suburb or smaller town.

    EMS can be stresful, but so can any medical field. You do see some awful stuff, but you can save lives too, and you get to see the results immediately sometimes, which is wonderfully rewarding.

    I like it, and I would reccomend the class to anyone.

    Audrey

    #61432
    undecidedundecided
    Participant

    How much time is usually required after I’ve been certified? I’m not looking to do this full-time, just as a way to gain exposure to the medical world and to earn a bit of spending money at the same time as doing my postbacc and possibly during med school.

    #61433
    boysmomboysmom
    Participant

    I am currently in an emt-b class, and I am finding it interesting, and practical. Hopefully when I pass the state exam, I will be able to earn money while I get experienced in one aspect of patient care. I have enjoyed getting to know the paramedics and others who have been involved in the class, they are an dedicated group.

    I will need to get childcare for any hours I spend gaining experience. I hope I will break even…

    #61435
    boysmomboysmom
    Participant

    Drey,

    Did you work in the city as an EMT? Did you work for a company? I guess you can have lots of different experiences depending on the company…. any tips?

    Liz

    #61436
    DreyDrey
    Participant

    I worked for a small firehouse, and they had lots of options for working. You could do either part time or full time, or if you lived nearby, you could just keep a pager, and when something happened, they’d send out a general call, and you could just go if you were around.

    You can also do ride-along programs if you want a volunteer opportunity. A lot of big cities have these programs, and sometimes you can get on the med flight helicopters, which would be incredible fun, in my opinion. You usually need your certification before you’re allowed to ride along though.

    In Boston, where I live now, I don’t work as an EMT, because MA is one of like 5 states that doesn’t accept the NREMT-B registration. A couple of my friends do though, and they work for private companies, which I gather is the norm in big cities, since their fire departments have enough to do.

    Also, what you are able to do depends on where you are. If you’re in an area with a shortage of paramedics, the EMT’s have a wider range of things they’re allowed to do, and you get more patient responsibility.

    From what I’ve heard, pay varies pretty widely. It’s about $13/hour up here, but that may be a factor of being in an expensive city.

    Hope this helps,

    Audrey

    #61438
    undecidedundecided
    Participant

    Hi Drey and others who have been certified,

    How long was the process of getting certified? I know it takes about 120 hours of coursework, but is it pretty condensed or do you have to do it over a couple of months? Also, was it pretty difficult to find part-time? I know in NY, most of the fire departments only hire full time EMTs..

    #61439
    kelar15kelar15
    Participant

    My EMT-B program is September through February, 8 hours a week, with breaks at the same time as university holidays (for Purdue). In addition we have a minimum of 12 hours in the ER and 20 hours on the ambulance required for graduation. So far it seems great and very interesting… it kind of embodies a lot of the things that I felt were missing in mechanical engineering and highlights the reasons I think I want to switch to medicine!

    Laura

    #61441
    LeafLeaf
    Participant

    I would love to get trained as an EMT. I say go for it undecided!!!

    I have training as a Wilderness First Responder. Basically it’s a normal first responder with a lot of special privledges. We have a set of 6 protocols that can only be used when more than 2 hours away from a hospital. These include clearning a spine injury, stopping CPR after .5hours, removing punture objects, reducing joints, etc..

    I do a lot of backpacking and other outdoor activity so it is very helpful and reassuring to have this training. And yes, I have used it more than once when on trail.

    The training itself is ~80 hours if you are interested. It stresses prevention and also quick thinking. We learn to build basics (splints, slings) out of what you might have with you out on trail. You might see a splint made out of a hiking pole or a backboard made of an internal frame backpack.

    It has definitely nurtured my interest in medicine and I have found myself talking about it in med school interviews ( I wasn’t planning on highlighing this..). Many medical schools/programs are starting to see the importance of wilderness medicine in this age of bioterrorist threats, etc..(even in an urban environment if there is a disaster you might be 2 hours away from a working hospital).

    Good luck with your decision.

    Leaf.

    #61443
    undecidedundecided
    Participant

    I checked with some places around NY and classes start in September, which is really bad b/c I wanted to get it done next spring when I have some more free time. Next Sept would mean taking EMT courses along with Physics, Orgo and Bio so I’m not sure that’s the greatest idea. Anybody know of anywhere else around the city that I can sign up for courses? Thanks!

    #61445
    Maria_dup2Maria_dup2
    Participant

    I’m in Chicago, but here they offer EMT year round at most community colleges, even some of the hospitals offer this training.

    Like I said not sure about NY or if you checked these places — but if not it might be worth a shot.

    The summer version of the course is really compressed as it usually the same material but three week shorter. :confused:

    Hope this helps.
    Good Luck!
    Maria

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