$Nurse practitioner?

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  • #28344
    PremedRNPremedRN
    Participant

    I was wondering, How much does an NP make? Doesn’t insurance companies/medicare/medicaid have a set rate for visits? I don’t think around these parts they make very much when compared to cost of graduate school. The closest university to where I live who has a program is private and each credit hour is about $500. :yikes:
    I am a RN and intially was considering finishing my BSN to NP (have ADN currently) but when I weighed the annual income that someone told me NP’s make, and loan payback, always wanting to become a doc was convincing enough to me to go back premed. I live in IN and heard FP’s make about 50-60K annually, if that. Does this sound right?
    ——-Dana

    #28345
    laleelalee
    Participant

    From what I’ve heard/researched, NPs make around 50-75K+, just depends on location and specialty. There are several accelerated ADN to NP programs out there…not sure on the cost. But, you can usually still work while going back to school.
    I do know that NPs can only bill medicare 80% of a MD/DO visit. That’s pretty much the extent of my knowledge about NPs…I’ve mainly been looking at PA schools, but have recently started researching the NP route.
    Good luck! :goodvibes:

    #28346
    maggie52maggie52
    Participant

    ours made around 60-70K ( five day week, no call)

    #28347
    PremedRNPremedRN
    Participant

    Thanks Maggie. Don’t get me wrong, that income is nothing to complain about especially with no call. But if I worked full-time right now as a resource RN, Id make 55,000/y. Of course that’s without all the extras regular employees get (benefits,paid time off) but I am married so I don’t need the insurance. I still have loans from getting my ADN, and am still borrowing to finish my bachelor’s. Considering this, and the cost of graduate school, and not being able to make much more than I can make now but yet tripling my debt—And always wanting to be a doc in the first place—I decided to enter back as premed instead of Nursing. I hope I never regret this decision.
    Maggie,
    What kind of patients do the NP’s see? The low complexities like flu, cough etc?

    Thanks,
    Dana

    #28348
    maggie52maggie52
    Participant

    Traditionally NP would focus on preventative medicine and education; and see office related problems…but my friends (usu in rural areas) do everything from round in the hosp, work in the ER alone sometimes, colposcopy, and certainly see elderly patients with 100 problems and a thousand meds!

    #28349
    PremedRNPremedRN
    Participant

    So they can see “train wrecks” (figuratively speaking)too just like you, huh?
    I live not so rurally. I work at the local hospital, I never see NP’s round. I did see a job post one time for a NP for ER. Hey, tell me, what’s the big difference between a NP and a clinical nurse specialist. Is it one mostly works in the hospital such as the open-heart unit, do you know? Sorry for the many questions, you would think I would know being a nurse and all. I really dont though.

    Thanks,
    Dana

    #28350
    laleelalee
    Participant

    PremedRN,

    I believe a clinical nurse specialist (CNS) is synonymous with the NP role. Here’s what I found:

    Clinical Nurse Specialists (CNS) are licensed registered nurses who have graduate preparation (Master’s or Doctorate) in nursing as a Clinical Nurse Specialist.

    Clinical Nurse Specialists are expert clinicians in a specialized area of nursing practice. The specialty may be identified in terms of:

    A Population (e.g. pediatrics, geriatrics, women’s health)

    A Setting (e.g. critical care, emergency room)

    A Disease or Medical Subspecialty (e.g. diabetes, oncology)

    A Type of Care (e.g. psychiatric, rehabilitation)

    A Type of Problem (e.g. pain, wounds, stress)

    Perhaps, a CNS is more “specialized” than a NP, however, I know of several NPs that are specialized.
    Also,
    Here’s a link to some NP programs, incase you’re interested:
    http://www.allnursingschools.com/featured/nurse-practitioner.php
    Good luck!

    #28351
    maggie52maggie52
    Participant

    99% sure that a clinical nurse specialist is NOT the same as a nurse practitioner ie.
    I have known CNS that do things like head up communtiy health programs or educational programs, etc in their filed of expertise…

    NP’s function/purpose would be to see patients…

    ANd yes they see the train-wrecks believe it or not- all the codes in the ER etc. (cannot be much more of a trainwreck than that)In fact when I show up in the ER they’ve already worked the pt’s up and I’m just admitting them ans finetuning things…AND on top of that the particularly…pushy ones almost act like they do not trust US (!!!)
    That said, I would pick a NP in my office any day ( over PA) although everyone has their own personality…

    #28352
    PremedRNPremedRN
    Participant

    Thanks Lalee.

    Maggie,
    As a nurse, I do know a lot about medical things, treatments, etc but am by far not as competent medically as a MD/DO. Part of me wants to say when I think about becoming a NP, I’d be afraid I wouldn’t be well trained enough to handle things like one who graduated from medical school the thought of that scares me. I don’t know how much clinical exposure they get in that role, but I do know it is not as much as a doctor.
    ——Dana

    #28353
    laleelalee
    Participant

    For clarification purposes, I copied and pasted from a nurse website regarding the NP/CNS distinction:
    Both the NP and CNS have the following roles: clinician (practitioner), educator, collaborator/consultant/change agent, researcher, advocate. The roles may be given different titles, but the functions are basically the same. The difference between the NP and CNS rests on how these roles are enacted. The NP has a central role of clinician and the other roles are secondary. The NP performs all roles, but the role of clinician/practitioner is central to the NP practice. NP’s are primary health care providers who diagnose illness, order, conduct, and interpret diagnostic and lab tests, prescribe medications (if authorized) and treatments. They provide health teaching and counsel patients.

    The CNS uses the same roles, however, each role has the same level of importance and the practice involves focusing on one or more roles at the same time. For the CNS there is no role that more central to the others.

    The topic of combining the 2 or keeping them separate is a hot topic in advance practice nursing. Some say the functions are more similar than different and the CNS and NP roles should be combined. Others hold that the functions are different and the CNS and NP roles should be kept separate.

    This is just a brief explanation, some nurses have done entire dissertations on this topic.

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