prereq’s

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  • #58960
    Valou15Valou15
    Participant

    Is there a reason why I should not take my pre req courses for med school at a community college? I called 3 med schools in my area some said they would accept them, others said maybe. I have a BS in Nursing and NO school loans, I’m worried about taking out a loan for the required classes and not getting in to med school. I would be devastated, i’m not even sure how I would deal with that, there is no way I would be able to afford to pay the loans back on a nurse’s salary. And it upsets me to know that MD’s would rather pay a PA ( a two year degree) more than a nurse practitioner who has a masters and more clinical experience. This is another reason why I want to continue to med school( my dream since i cant even remember…maybe forever!!!!!) I know i rambled sorry about that, alot for me to think about. VAl

    #58962
    efex101efex101
    Participant

    You did the rigth thing by calling some medical schools to see what their take is on this. Many medical schools admissions directors would prefer that pre-reqs be taken at a four year institution if at all possible. This stems from the perception (probably incorrect for many community colleges) that classes at four year institutions are more rigorous. Because you are applying as a non-traditional and have to present yourself in the best possible light (unless you have a super GPA and past grades are not an issue for you) going to a community college may diminish your application. If you can and can afford it I would go to the four year undergraduate instituion just to demonstrate that a) I can handle rigourous coursework and b) that I have the motivation to pursue this goal. Of course this are just my personal takes from talking to various medical schools admission directors, medical students, etc. Good luck.

    #58963
    lillianlillian
    Participant

    I in the same boat. the med shcool I talked to gave me a list of approved classes to take at the comm college for 2 years. they didn’t say “maybe”. Comm college is 1.5 miles from me and way cheaper.

    #58965
    shannashanna
    Participant

    I’m probably going about this whole business all wrong…

    #58967
    TJTJ
    Participant

    You know… I think there is a stigma attached to community college and it may not be truly warranted. I’m finishing up my associates at a community college (I graduate in May) after which I’ll be headed to a university. A lot of the people in my Chemistry class are having a problem with it, and this one girl went to one of her friends who goes to a university and has the second semester of Chemistry. The girl absolutely had no idea of what we were doing because they were just starting that chapter! My professor has a Phd from Harvard in Biochemistry and covers 10 chapters in one semester! When I compared our syllabus with that of several other Universities, it covered the same topics. I, personally, would do as mentioned earlier and ask if it’s a definite “no” or would they have advisors that could help you choose classes that would be acceptable.

    #58969
    MeeshMeesh
    Participant

    Just a note….
    As far as a pay discrepancy for PA’s and NP’s and a perceived difference in experience/education….
    You’re right, most PA’s “only” have a 2 year degree….it’s called a MASTER’S DEGREE! Most PA’s have Bachelor’s as well and about 5000 hours of hands-on experience prior to entering PA school.
    And, most states pay the NP’s and PA’s the same amount if it’s the same job. But, some MD’s do have preferences for one or the other. Often though, the preference comes down to an individual’s experience, both before and after their advanced training….
    sigh!

    #58971
    Valou15Valou15
    Participant

    Sorry, but I understand if you dont see this the way I do, a PA may have a masters but in what? business? Chem? maybe even BIO? Does that make up for the 6 years experience in the healthcare field the NP has? especially when you look at the criteria for entering the NP program… in any case thats all I have to add.

    #58973
    MeeshMeesh
    Participant

    Originally posted by Valou15:
    Sorry, but I understand if you dont see this the way I do, a PA may have a masters but in what? business? Chem? maybe even BIO? Does that make up for the 6 years experience in the healthcare field the NP has? especially when you look at the criteria for entering the NP program… in any case thats all I have to add.

    You are so misinformed about the differences (and similarities for that matter) between NP’s and PA’s, it frustrates me. :rolleyes:
    Most PA’s have a Master’s in Physician Assistant Practice (similar in type to a Master’s in Nursing earned by NP’s – a academic and clinical degree), but I’ve also know of some programs that earn a Master’s in Public Health. It’s not a random Master’s degree. Like the NP program, you have to do research and write/defend a thesis, in addition to completing the academic and clinical requirements.

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