single mother stuck

Home Forums Introductions & Connections single mother stuck

Viewing 5 posts - 1 through 5 (of 5 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #91485
    Crystal RandallCrystal Randall
    Participant

    Hello every one. I am a single mother with one child. I am almost ready to just give up, but I know I can do it. I work full time for a dead end bank. there’s no room to grow. I want to become a radiologist or nurse practioner for infants. I do have a high school diploma and some college( at a the local community college) but I had to quit two years ago when I found out I was pregnant. SO now I have a beautiful two year old daughter. And the burning desire to go to school. I want to know how do sigle parents like me make the transition from working to just going to school. in the state of south carolina, the system will not help even a single mother who works full time making more than 20,000.00 a year. I pay now 115.00 a week for child care. rent, electricty ,phone,etc. with no financial assistance. So if you were me should i quit my dead beat job, to go to school and struggle to become what I want to be in life?

    If any one has any idea’s. Please help
    Thanks desprite mom.

    #91487
    MomMDMomMD
    Participant

    Welcome Crystal,

    I just read about this service in Child magazine. It’s for single moms who want to share a house together. This can help out with childcare, etc. This might free up the time you need to attend classes….. it may lower you cost of living a little. Have a look and see if this interests you… http://www.co-abode.com/

    Sethina

    #91488
    bjwarrenbjwarren
    Participant

    Hello Crystal!

    You’ve certainly come to the right place for support and encouragement. I don’t have any answers for you. The article that Sethina mentioned sounds great. I’m going to check that out too!
    Luckily, I was able to move back in with my parents to save costs and they are very supportive. I have a 9 month old daughter, and I too am a single parent. I did not quit working, but I gave up my good paying job to work at the university where I go to school. Since the education industry does not pay any of their staff enough to survive alone, I am eligible for assistance, and I get tuition free. 😀
    The main thing is to be happy and take care of yourself so that you can be there to take care of your daughter. Only you can make those tough decisions and decide what’s best, and to know that whatever you decide it will be the best for you at the time.
    Feel free to PM or email me if you would like to talk further.

    Good luck to you and best wishes!
    Brandi 😉

    #91490
    snssns
    Participant

    Working at a University is a good idea. I was fortunate enough that my Mom got a job at our local university (which was a private school) so I could get tuition free. I took out student loans to pay for the fees. While in college I worked on campus at two part-time jobs to pay rent, grocery, etc. I signed up for university owned low-rent apartments on campus. Living on campus also meant I didn’t need a car which saved money. I worked in food services on campus which meant I got a free meal on days I worked. I also took classes every summer, because there are no fees in the summer, classes are cheaper. When I graduated, I only owed ~$4,000 instead of $60,000.

    My co-workers that worked full-time had free tuition but could only attend school part-time. One lady I worked with finished her undergrad degree and law school while working full time on campus and attending school tuition-free part-time. She also had a child, jr high age I think. You still have to pay fees, books, and supplies.

    Med school also has options to pay for it. Military scholarships- you give them 4 years of service after residency. Public Health scholarships- same as military. Some underserved communities will pay your school loans if you agree to practice in their town.

    There are options, but only you can decide if it is really what you want to do. I know there are probably many more options than the above. Maybe you could make an appointment with a financial aid counselor at the school you want to attend just to see what is available for you.

    #91491
    laleelalee
    Participant

    Hang in there! I am a single mom, too. My daughter is 8 now and I have been going to school FOREVER now!! I finally finished by BS last year and now I’m taking my sciences post-bac part-time and will apply to med-school next year. I’ve made many sacrifices to achieve my goals and perserverence was the key. You just have to make out a plan and stick to it. I WANTED to just go to school full-time, but it just wasn’t an option (house payment, car payment, etc :boggled: ). Find a job that will work around your class schedule if you’re not happy with your current job. I have planned every step necessary in my journey. When I completed my AAS in physical therapy, I worked for awhile to establish myself and then went into a partnership and now am self-employed and can pretty much set my own schedule. But, during this venture, I devoted all my time to establish this position so that I would be able to cut back on working, but still make a decent living. Most important in my endeavor was making sure my daughter’s happiness wasn’t compromised. I waited until she was in kindergarden then established the company (took a year!!), then when she was in the 1st grade I went back to complete my BS. She’s now a 3rd grader 😮 ! Up until this semester, she hasn’t had to go to daycare after school. Unfortunately, the labs for 2 of my classes are in the afternoons 🙁 . But she’s now at an age that she enjoys the extra time to play with her friends.
    OK, I know this is long-winded….my point is this:
    1. Decide what you want to achieve (Associates, bachelors, etc)
    2. Look into the schools in your area. What is their class schedule like? Is it a school that embraces the adult student?
    3. Talk with the financial aid office and see what is available to you. Talk in PERSON, not on the phone…more interaction=more information!
    4. Talk with your employer and see if you can adjust your schedule, do some work at home, etc. If your employer doesn’t seem receptive to your aspirations, then look for another job.
    Alot of this is easier said than done, I know, but hopefully, it will atleast help you with initiating a plan.
    Good luck!!
    Laurie

Viewing 5 posts - 1 through 5 (of 5 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.